aliando agile IT service management, agile ITSM, Dana Stoll, agiles IT service management
aliando methods for agile IT service management, agile ITSM, Dana Stoll, agiles IT service management
aliando agile IT service management, agile ITSM, Dana Stoll, agiles IT service management
aliando methods for agile IT service management, agile ITSM, Dana Stoll, agiles IT service management
aliando methods for agile IT service management, agile ITSM, Dana Stoll, agiles IT service management

Minimalist Yoga Breathing · Mar 26, 02:52 PM

I was once driving through Northern Ireland during a vacation trip and noticed that I’m not really experiencing anything of the landscape I drove by. There was this stream of thoughts that could hardly be silenced. I became aware that I had no idea how to change the situation, where to put my attention to, what to relax into. If I concentrated on the outside, those thoughts were still there, and every once in a while I was back “in thoughts”. This experience was rather frustrating, but — as I now know — there is a simple remedy to it that has been practiced for a very long time. [Alternative Pseudoscience in Awareness]

The clue to this remedy can be found in yogic or buddhist breathing exercises. They get you to balance your awareness evenly between inside and outside phenomena, maintaining a superposition. This superposition is the basis to handle your thoughts. To do a minimalist Breathing Yoga, you really only need one simple exercise. The routine is at the same time a basic concentration exercise, and you can do it at any time, doing anything, as it will keep you focused in the present.

The Rhythm

As a basic rhythm, inhale on four heartbeats, and exhale on six. If you’re not too aware of your hearbeat, you can also slowly count to four in your mind during inhaling, and to six when exhaling. To follow a natual flow, you can divide the exhaling into four counts of exhaling and two counts of resting before you naturally let the inhalation start again.

So there are two patterns:

1-2-3-4 (inhale)
1-2-3-4-5-6 (exhale)

or

1-2-3-4 (inhale)
1-2-3-4 (exhale)
5-6 (rest)

If you’re synchronizing this breathing technique with your heartbeat, you will notice that both breathing and heartbeat will slow down a bit after a while, as this style of breathing relaxes you. But even only maintaining the steady rhythm will help you relax, and as studies have shown, slow down your heartbeat up to about 10 percent.

Continue What You Were Doing

Once you’ve established this rhythm of breathing, you can go on with whatever you were doing. If you were reading some paper or specification, read it while maintaining this rhythm of breathing. If you were doing some other chores, do them while maintaining this rhythm. Your attention, then is shared between the internal observation of your breathing and the external observation of what you were doing. This shared attention is perfectly fine, but don’t ever try to put your attention at three things at once, it does not work.

Your attention is optimal, when you concentrate on one external (visual/auditoriy) and one internal phenomenon (somatosensory) phenomneon at the same time, for example, if you have body awareness while you are doing chores. If you manage to keep your concentration like that, there is no space for intermittent thoughts that distract you. If either your body awareness gets lost (you get sucked outside) or your outside awareness gets lost (you get sucked inside), you dissociate, like in some form of hypnosis. Then, what you experience is guided by thoughts that either arise automatically or are guided by subsceptions.

That’s why Zen Master Taisen Deshimaru recommended concentrating on your posture while you are doing anything. Or in meditation, you concentrate on your breathing as an anchor to examine any other perception that may arise, so you don’t get drawn into them. Or why Aikido Master Koichi Tohei recommends “holding the one point”, i.e. keeping awareness on a spot below your navel with a shrinking sensation. The important thing is not to solely focus on these perceptions, but to focus on them and whatever outside perception you are currently having due to your acting in the world — at the same time. This keeps your focus balanced between inside and outside, silences unwanted thoughts and is the basic foundation to master all the finer steps, for example, dealing with emotions.

Thus, don’t mistake this Minimalist Yoga Breathing for an oxygen routine. But also don’t search anything special in it. It’s a tool to calm your body, and balance your perception between your inner and outer world.